Questions? Feedback? powered by Olark live chat software

Your hearing aids are very valuable and a vital part of your everyday life. An important part of taking care of them is learning to avoid losing your hearing aids. According to U.S. News and World Report the average American spends one year of their life looking for lost and misplaced items. Your hearing aids small stature is often an important factor when you buy them, but it can become a double edge sword when it comes to not misplacing them.

There are two key elements to avoid losing your hearing aids: routine and safe storage.

Try to keep a consistent routine, for example: you wake up every morning and retrieve your hearing aids from their case on your bedside table. When you take a shower you return to the case to ensure they are safe from moisture. The case always remains in the same place. You follow a similar pattern of taking them out and putting them in everyday.

If you have to veer from your routine and you are worried you may forget where you put them. Try saying out loud to yourself; “my hearing aids are in the bowl on the kitchen table.” You could also enlist help from a family member, by mentioning where you left them. Always remember to store them someplace secure, out of reach of moisture, pets and small children.

Safe storage is another key factor in always keeping your hearing aids safe. A padded case or dehumidifier box is best. This way you always know, when your hearing aids are not in your ears, they are safe. We can’t tell you how many times we’ve heard things like, “I just took them out and put them on a napkin in my kitchen for a few minutes,” or “the batteries ran out so I put them in my pocket.” These recipes for disaster frequently end with a napkin tossed in the trash or a pair of pants thrown in the wash machine.

If you do lose your hearing aids, remain calm and retrace your step. Take your time and think of where you last had them. Most of our hearing aids include loss and damage coverage. When you’ve exhausted your search, call your hearing instrument specialist and see what options you have for replacement.

Tips for caregivers:

When the hearing aid wearer has memory issues keeping track of hearing aids can be tough. However, being able to hear plays such an important roll in keeping them communicating, it is worth it. We suggest using a large colorful pencil box with some padding inside and a picture of a hearing aid on the top. Keep the box in one place. When it is easily visible it serves as a reminder to put hearing aids in and take them out. For those living in care facilities; we highly recommend painting the hearing aids with a bright color. Then they are more easily spotted when they are misplaced.