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As hunting season gets into full swing it’s the perfect time to remember among other safety concerns hunters are at risk for permanent hearing loss. It is vital that sportsmen use hunter hearing protection to save their ears from loud firearm noises and loud game calls. Permanent hearing damage can occur when you expose yourself to noises greater than 90 dB. Gunshot noises can range from 120 to 190 dB depending on the weapon.

Hunters who use a blind to hunt are at an increased risk for hearing loss. The gunshot sound reverberates in the enclosed area, lengthening the amount of time you are exposed to the loud noise.

Young hunters in particular may not think about wearing anything to protect their ears, but when they come home and notice a ringing sound in the ear that was closest to the muzzle, it will be too late. Hearing loss is a gradual process, so you may not notice anything at first. After a few hunting trips the ringing noise may not go away and you will find that when listening to people talk everyone sounds like they are mumbling.

The Myth of Hearing Protection

Many hunters will argue that wearing ear protection hinders shooting accuracy, safety and enjoyment. This is simply not true.  Advances in technology for hunter hearing protection now allow you to extend the range of your hearing, while limiting the harmful effects of muzzle blasts.

At Southwestern Hearing Centers we offer electronic hunter hearing protection called SoundGear. It gives hunters high definition sound enhancement paired with automatic noise suppression. The tiny device uses seamless sound activated compression to trigger instant suppression of any noise over 93 dB. Investing in hunter hearing protection is just as important as investing in a gun and hunting gear.

Protecting your hearing is easy with the right tools. Call Southwestern Hearing Centers today and talk to hearing professional to see if SoundGear is right for you. This hunting season bring home a trophy buck, but leave the possibility of hearing loss in the woods.